January 8, 2013

Article: @DJNUMARK “Let The Light Shine”

It’s often said that the DJ is the backbone of Hip Hop, an integral component on which an entire artform is based. The essential understanding of diverse genres, an effortlessly blending of seemingly disparate grooves, and a signature sound that separates one’s self from his peers have been necessary ingredients in any DJ’s pedigee. DJ Nu-Mark not only embodies all of the above-mentioned elements but has showcased his production prowess to craft an album that melds different styles in his recently released Broken Sunlight. From those who may be unfamiliar with Nu-Mark’s Hip Hop trajectory, he worked at Correct Records and Fat Beats in Los Angeles, in addition to being a member of Jurassic Five and touring the world over as a much sought after DJ. Nu-Mark is someone who has taken his passion for music and been able to turn it into something more than simply “two turntables and a microphone.” His hustle, determination, and dedication has allowed this versatile individual to move from the speakers to the silver screen while maintaining a genuine and authentic feel to whatever he touches. Nu-Mark took time out to  discuss the creative process that went into crafting this album and his scoring efforts for an upcoming Chris Brown film, amongst other topics. Read more about how this dynamic DJ and most humble individual gets down for his.

Explain the direction of this new album. How does it compare to past endeavors be it solo or group oriented?

I really wanted to create an album that came direct from my heart. I felt like it was important to create material that could be played in my ride or spin as a DJ. Right now when I DJ, I truly get into a variety of genres…so this album reflects that with everything from classic Hip Hop joints, gutsy Funk and Latin Cumbias.

The Ernie Hines-inspired “Our Generation” really harkens back to Pete and CL’s “Straighten It Out” joint from Mecca and the Soul Brother. Can you give us some insight into how you approached that song and what it means to you to re-program a classic?

It’s been really difficult for me to simply dig for records these days. I’m getting much more of a fix from trading multitrack recordings with friends. There’s something so strong and mysterious about hearing a classic Soul or Rock song in its pure state. I wanted to put a spin on “Our Generation” and give the DJ/Producer a juicy, open drum break to play around with. It was just good fun…no other way to explain it. Never thought the drums were that bangin’ underneath that song. I’d love to do more of these.

You derive influences from genres outside of Hip Hop and meld them into your sound. Please tell readers what music specifically inspires you as a producer and DJ.

Well, right now I’ve been extremely intrigued with Latin music as a whole. This genre really splinters into so many styles and textures that it’s hard not to respect it. I knew going into this album that I wanted to touch on this genre a bit. Funk has always been the cornerstone to my production approach, so it was fitting that I incorporated it with songs like “Don’t Play Around” featuring Aloe Blacc and Charles Bradley.

The “Tropicalifornia” song is another example of your interest in music outside of Hip Hop which features some slick production as well. What’s your connection to Quantic and how did this record come about?

I’ve been a big fan of Quantic for several years. He’s definitely one of the most prolific producers of our time. Both Q and I have a good understanding of the rhythm section to a song. I gave him a beefed up Cumbia beat and he added guitar and bass. I then  followed with cuts, keys, accordion, and horns, incorporating musicians here in L.A. Quantic lives in Cale, Columbia so we continued to send the track back and forth via Internet till we were happy with the final product.

“Oya’ Indebure” is one such record that would be considered “left field” on most Hip Hop releases. How does it fit in the overall soundscape of Broken Sunlight?

I titled the album Broken Sunlight to break up all the emotions and styles I wanted to display in 2012. The goal of this song was to get people on the dance floor. I’ve received a lot of emails about this recently. People just feel good when they hear it and when we created it we knew it was something special. I wasn’t really trying to make songs fit together in a traditional album since I knew they would be broken up into six 10″ singles throughout 2012.

If you can divulge the information, how much of “Oya’ Indebure” is programmed or live?

This is musician based with a drum program underneath. There were a lot of vocal parts and percussion needed to make the song go where it went. There’s like 8 or 9 female background vocalist from Brazil which really drives the track home in my opinion.

This album plays like a full-length that was made for fans and you, as well, with more focus on quality than simply “accessibility.” Did you have this in mind when you made the project?

Yeah, I guess…I just wanted to make music that represented where I was as an artist. Not sure what you mean exactly by accessible but I tried my hardest to make it DJ friendly as well as something that contained staying power. Hopefully it will stick around a bit when I’m dead and gone (laughs).

Another record that oozes with this ethos is “The Fever.” Who did you make this record for because it captures the dance-ability of classic disco/boogie records with Hip Hop elements obviously present?

I think this record describes my audience best actually. I play this joint each time I spin and it wins each time. Shouts to A-Skillz on the co-production with this joint. We had a great time piecing all the sequences step-by- step. Sometimes you need no or little vocals to make a music bed come together.

Moving to a more equipment-based question: What kind of equipment are you using now –software and/or hardware?

I’m using Maschine with Ableton Live currently. I have a lot of experimenting to do this year. I need to learn Akai’s Renaissance and Ableton’s Push. I have a feeling that I might incorporate some new tools soon. I use a tape machine from time to time to capture a textured sample sound. I love outboard gear as well as plug-ins.

During one of our conversations, you mentioned you were scoring some music for Sony Films. Can you expand on this more?

Yeah, I’m creating original beats with Orchestration. Composer, Chris Lennertz and I teamed up on a lot of cues for an upcoming Sony film titled Battle Of The Year. This is a B-Boy Motion Picture staring Chris Brown. I’m thrilled to death to work in this capacity.  I love deep drama packed beats and I’m creating a good dose of them in this movie.

How have you made the transition from producer/DJ into the world of film scoring? Is it similar or different to how you normally construct music?

It’s very time consuming and you have to stay flexible for the movie house because what they say goes! That being said, it’s been one of the most rewarding challenges of my career. The music heads at Sony have been very trusting and pleased with what I’ve turned in so far…probably because my heart is in it!

What’s up next for DJ Nu-Mark?

I’m on my way to tour Australia for Broken Sunlight. After that I’m jumping into a project with Slimkid3 from The Pharcyde. I’m also dabbling in the creation of a music software idea that’s at the basic stages right now so I can’t share much but I’m very excited. In April there will be a very exciting new development that everyone asks me about…I’m also not allowed to speak about that but people always ask me if this will ever happen again and it will!

Please visit me at www.unclenu.com for direct access to Broken Sunlight Needle USBs, Double Vinyl, 10” Vinyl, Tees and the whole enchilada.

Check some additional visuals from DJ Nu-Mark’s latest album below:

DJ Nu-Mark “Dumpin’ Em All” featuring Bumpy Knuckles

DJ Nu-Mark “Tonight” featuring J-Live, M3 & Erica Dee

Broken Sunlight Buy-Links:
DJ Nu-Mark (Direct)
Amazon
iTunes

Chris Moss

Related posts:

DJ Spotlight: Diggin' In The Crates with DJ Big Bink
Toca Tuesdays: Allindstrom.com Takeover Tonight on Shade 45 at 8pm EST!
New Music Tuesdays: November 8, 2011

One Trackback

  1. [...] It’s often said that the DJ is the backbone of Hip Hop, an integral component on which an entire artform is based. The essential understanding of diverse genres, an effortlessly blending of seemingly disparate grooves, and a signature sound that separates one’s self from his peers have been necessary ingredients in any DJ’s pedigee. DJ Nu-Mark not only embodies all of the above-mentioned elements but has showcased his production prowess to craft an album that melds different styles in his recently released Broken Sunlight. From those who may be unfamiliar with Nu-Mark’s Hip Hop trajectory, he worked at Correct Records and Fat Beats in Los Angeles, in addition to being a member of Jurassic Five and touring the world over as a much sought after DJ. Nu-Mark is someone who has taken his passion for music and been able to turn it into something more than simply “two turntables and a microphone.” His hustle, determination, and dedication has allowed this versatile individual to move from the speakers to the silver screen while maintaining a genuine and authentic feel to whatever he touches. Nu-Mark took time out to discuss the creative process that went into crafting this album and his scoring efforts for an upcoming Chris Brown film, amongst other topics. Read more about how this dynamic DJ and most humble individual gets down for his,here. [...]

Post a Comment

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

*
*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>